mylittledoxy:

Support » http://www.patreon.com/doxydoo
Guest » http://www.patreon.com/seel

Pokemon in a traditional D&D party. From left to right: rogue, fighter, priest, wizard. Took the better part of two days to draw, but turned out well in the end.

Request done for the folks over on /vp/’s drawthread. Sceptile in Kousuke Seto’s (Kagerou Project) hoodie.

So I just received a pic from one of my commissioners featuring my art on a T-shirt for his girlfriend! They both really like the design, and it turned out really well in real life. At the moment, I don’t have any plans to release it for sale, but I may look into that in the future~

qualitytutorials:

helpfulharrie:

Source: FOERVRAENGD

List of tutorials that helped me with environmental painting:
“How to make your own Perspective Grid in PS” <—- this one is the best thing I’ve ever discovered. Srsly CHECK IT OOOOUUUUT!
Snuffen’s Background Tutorial P1More or less ALL tutorials by Griffsnuff is awesome, so make sure to check out the rest of them!
More or less ALL tutorials made by AquaSixio!

List of youtube channels that also helped and inspired me:

FZDSCHOOL - More or less one of the most known concept art-related resources I know on youtube. It’s great to sit and draw and just listen to the talking.

SinixDesign- This guy is also great! He has some design workshops ever now and then where the viewers can send in their stuff for critique! very encouraging and inspiring!

moatddtutorials- This guy is more into drawing than painting, and has a more cartoony style. He has interesting methods when it comes to perspective. And he also challenge himself in some of his videos (the engine block video is a great example of this)

foxOrian- Also known here on dA for his awesome perspective and composition tutorials. He has a youtube channel where he posts some videos that might be interesting as well.

Admins Notes// Oh yes, I’m sure this will come in handy for many artists out there, pass it along!

You know Inumuta’s the type of person to breed a 5/6IV competitive Pokemon team with all the right natures and complain when you use ubers. Inspired by a user on /vp/’s draw thread.

hello! can i ask for a tutorail in hands/arms and legs/feet?
Anonymous

zemael:

Hey! Sorry for the late reply, I haven’t really had time to do the tutorial for you! But, I did one today. It’s kinda messy and not 100% anatomically perfect (I do several flaws myself) but I think I made some good points!

  • Arms:

image

Arms cannot be done without shoulders, so that’s why I will include them here. To know how one body part works, you need to understand the other parts too. I suggest drawing a stick figure, as shown above. Do it with shoulders and everything - don’t care about anatomy. Really, don’t - go mad! You can figure out how to deal with the anatomy AFTER you have figured how to draw the body freely.

image

I imagine most body parts to be shaped as tear drops, as shown above; especially the arms and legs. Draw them above the stick figure - don’t be afraid to overlap the teardrops. In fact, I suggest it! The best way to understand anatomy is to think of it as shapes and doll-parts.

image

After you’ve figured that out, do several, VERY tiny, small doodles like these. Go crazy - don’t bother with anatomy just yet. Do them also very quickly and so small you can’t think of the details. Just keep doing this until you sorta understand how arms work. 

image

Here is a doodle of a “real” arm, and as you can see, how it’s shaped it resembles the teardrops above. A general rule is to constantly draw the body in curves - male AND female. NEVER draw a single line straight.

image

I mentioned before I thought it was important to include shoulders/other body parts to understand another. This is why. The body basically has a “flow” when you move. The red lines clearly shows the flow. This is also how you can create a dynamic pose: think of the flow. The muscles are formed that way to be able to function. Which reminds me, buy some good anatomy books. And I’m talking about more or less MEDICAL anatomy books - you think you won’t need it - but trust me, it’s more useful than you can imagine. I do NOT suggest buying “stylistic” anatomy books, like Christopher Hart (ugh NO), for example, as these can mislead you. Medical anatomy books CANNOT because they MUST be right.

image

And for the last part, here’s some “do’s” and “don’ts”. It’s important to remember the muscles between the neck and shoulders. Many, especially when drawing females, forget this. It’s true the most visible it is - the more muscular you will look. But even the most petite people have these. Your neck literally would not function if you didn’t have these supporters. Then, the arms below is just to show why it’s important to draw the body with curves. Many have probably heard “straight lines for males” which is a complete lie. They will look stiff and unnatural. Curves can both empathize muscles AND fat. Heck, even your bones aren’t straight.

  • Legs:

image

Legs certainly are the hardest. There’s a good reason for this; because they’re one of our most strongest muscles, and they are more or less dominating when it comes to poses (together with the spine). However, just like with the arms, draw a stick figure. I won’t suggest drawing them completely straight, as you can see here, as it will add weight. Do teardrops shapes. As for the hips - think of them as panties or briefs. This is not a MUST; but it will help; I think!

image

And just like the arms, do small doodles. Don’t be serious, play around until you get the idea.

image

image

As you can see, these legs easily can be turned into teardrops even when they’re detailed like this.

image

Now, what makes legs/hips interesting is that the way fat gathers there. Although not a must, seeing as we’re all different, females tend to get more fat there than men. Usually, however, it’s not at the SIDE of the hops, but at the thighs, calves and the “love handles”. (Excuse my english, aaah…) Women also tend to have bigger hips, but again, it’s not a must. It’s not uncommon to have small hips, either; or big hips for men, etc.

image

image

Of course, the legs too follow the “flow”!

image

Something worth noting is the “Standing point” The standing point is basically a straight line, and the further away you are from the line; the more unbalanced you are. To create a dynamic pose you should avoid that line as much as possible. However, if you want to look balanced/realistic, have the one leg stand there for support. The leg to the left is balanced, as you can see one of the legs is taking all the weight; with other words, it’s the support leg-making it balanced. The legs to the right, however, are likely to fall over if she keeps standing like that!

image

image

Now for some more do’s and don’ts. I already mentioned the barbie legs, invisible heels and micro-mini crotch in my previous tutorial, but these two are different. I see this mistake a lot; when you sit down, your thighs will become wider because you’re pressing all the fat to the sides. Now, this also depends on how you’re positioning your legs. How much it widens depends on how much fat you have in the first place; but it will always be there.

And then there’s this awkward “thigh gap”. Before I get any haters telling me how I “thin shame”, please, take a seat and read this. Good? Good. How much space you actually have between your thighs depends fully on how you’re standing, bending, angle, body type and everything else. However, the one to the right? Not likely.

  • Hands:

image

Okay, I’m getting really lazy now; so I’ll be quick. Draw a rectangle. Sorta like this; it doesn’t have to be exactly like this - since hands can be shaped VERY differently. Just compare to your friends.

image

Draw a little triangle attached to it.

image

Now, the fingers! How long they should be and etc doesn’t really matter either. But if you’re unsure, draw them as tear drops, too.

image

Now, draw the fingers! Starting to look like a hand, sort of.

image

Then draw the details and fix things you didn’t like. I really don’t like the way this is drawn but I’m just tired right now.

image

Just like the legs/arms, practice by doing that simple figure really quickly.

image

Guess what? Hands also follow “the flow”!

  • Feet:

image

image

Okay, I’m getting really lazy. Plus, feet are SUPER HARD- I’m just going to say this: think of them as triangles. Overlap them; think of it as 3D!

image

image

image

Practice practice practice! And medical anatomy books. And photo references. And real-life references!

Hope this helped! \o/ As I said, I’m nowhere near perfect but, ahh, I tried.

A chibi Rin for Shevy over at http://hitmenandswimmers.tumblr.com

isaia:

giancarlovolpe:

Hey kids!  If you’re a filmmaker, animator, or storyboard artist and you don’t know what screen direction is, you might want to read this.

For the record, there are always exceptions to the rule in filmmaking, which is why I pointed out 3 examples here.

I’ve also found that comic books tend to NOT take screen direction as seriously as film does, but I’m still on the fence if this is wise or not.  My favorite comics pay close attention to screen direction so as to not confuse the reader.

Good luck!

AHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH!!! YES

twisted-transistorr:

paindemands-tob3-felt:

pandabearjayy:

I absolutely love the end result.

i can’t believe i watched that

i thought this was going to take me on a spiritual journey and it did